The Technology House of Cards

I am a dinosaur.

I started selling microcomputers in 1982, bought one of the first Apple Macintosh computers off the line in 1984, started my own electronic publishing business in 1987 and kept pace with technology until a few years ago. Heck, I even used to set up and administer websites. Look ma, I love technology. But no more.

Michelle has taken over that part of our lives and I grow food. I put seeds in the ground and tend them and deliver food to people.

I realized I’m a dinosaur when I read an article about how automakers are starting to phase out CD players in cars, because people don’t use them. Or at least young people don’t use them. I tried to get into the whole ‘iTunes’ thing, but I just never got it. I think it was probably because I always got my daughters’ hand-me-down iPods when their batteries were giving up the ghost, so I just got frustrated and couldn’t be bothered.

The Guardian recently published an article about how people in the IT crowd were terrified about the potential for havoc caused by hackers. I guess it’s kind of like how climate scientists are terrified about feedback loops, but really, who trusts experts? Because really, putting our entire financial system and critical infrastructure like power grids on-line where they are so vulnerable to hacking, well, that’s just the way things go. Accept it.

When we moved off the grid 17 years ago our radiophone system was complicated and our internet was dial up so we couldn’t use the phone at the same time as the internet. So we didn’t do much with it. Maybe 12 or 13 years ago we got satellite internet but it was still wonky and slow and it took us (the “royal us,” in other words, Michelle) a few years to be confident enough in it to start trusting it for things like on-line banking. It’s always disconcerting when you’re doing stuff on-line and the internet craps out in the middle of the transaction. So where DID that money go? Do we have it, or does the bank have it, or is it just gone?

So I believe I can safely say that like most people we really didn’t start trusting the internet to begin migrating a lot of their key activities to the internet until about a decade ago. So in just about a decade, we have taken all the activities that humans developed over millennia, like exchanging physical goods with physical cash or something approximating that, to putting all these life supporting, essential activities into binary code, as electronic bits on this human created enterprise, called the internet.

When I see the confidence many people have in this whole bizarre concept I am quite terrified. This really hit home recently when I spoke to someone in the computer industry who seemed quite gob smacked that humans, in particular North Americans, are so blindly trustworthy to believe that nothing bad could happen to their ‘stuff’ when it all exists in the ether… as electronic bits floating around on electronic networks. Many (or most) of us have seen glitches in the matrix with our stuff, whether it’s payments or bills or whatever, and we just blindly keep trusting more and more of our essential activities to this technology juggernauts.

It’s all good … until it’s not.

And I know what you’re saying… ‘Well I couldn’t resist. My employer direct deposits my paycheque electronically into my account, and many government departments won’t deal with me unless it’s electronic, and a lot of businesses seem determined to force me to migrate to doing things on-line (you know, because they make more money when I do.)”

I try not to push our books on this blog too often, but I think people need a re-set sometimes, and that’s the reason I wrote “The Sensible Prepper.” People need a reminder that having a backup plan is not a bad idea. Indeed, it’s increasingly becoming a really, really good idea. It is not a ‘guns and ammo’ survival book. It is a logical plan with lots of tips for you to implement. The kind of tips for which there is no downside. Sometimes you just need a gentle reminder and some logical pointers on where to start. You can order the book here:

 

 

One thing that I would strongly like to recommend is that you always keep a hundred dollars in your wallet and $400 or $500 in cash at your house. This might make me sound like a crackpot, until it doesn’t. Cash machines go down some times. Interac machines go down. Computer networks go down. People’s accounts get hacked and their identities get stolen and things can go very badly sometimes. If you don’t keep cash in your wallet because you’re worried about being robbed and losing that cash, then you aren’t looking at where the real threat is.

But hey, that’s just old food growin’, wood heatin’, book readin’, CD player usin’, cash usin’ Cam talkin’, so don’t pay any attention to me. I hear Apple has a new electronic payment system you can use on your smartphone. Woo hoo, gotta go get that app!

3 Responses to “The Technology House of Cards”

  • j:

    I agree

    It seems like blind faith in technological progress is this civilization’s religion.

    What’s the point of having cheap, fancy toys when all the manufacturing here is gone and the infrastructure needed to run the toys is falling apart?

    Wish the effort being put towards developing and selling silly novelty toys was actually put towards solving real problems with practical solutions. (…like investing in the power grid and electrical rail to cut oil dependence?)

  • Debra Lacy:

    Still get mailed bank statements for the very reason that I don’t trust the grid or the internet. What proof do you have of what you have in the bank if the power grid goes down and it’s all electronic? Zilch. Plus it irks me that companies want you to go paperless so YOU have to use your own ink and paper if you want or need to print out the bill. Green washing! I have to set reminders on my phone to pay certain bills that have required me (or tricked me) to go paperless. Otherwise, outa sight, outa mind. As you said, technology works great until it doesn’t. Dark ages anyone?

  • Kitty Hegemann:

    I don’t think I would want to use satellite internet for something requiring a secure connection. I have problems sending my stuff from my house into the ether. AND, we know mobiles are not secure. More into the ether stuff.

    I do use DSL for banking, buying, and payments. I still don’t trust Internet for much of anything, but I use it anyway. My home based business requires me to do so. That’s life in 2015.

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Cam Mather and his wife Michelle live independently off the electricity grid using the sun and wind to power their home and their CSA. Cam is working towards the goal of making his home “zero-carbon” and with his extensive garden he aims to grow as much of his own food as possible. He is available to speak at conferences and other events and has motivated many people to integrate renewable energy into their lives, reduce their footprint on the planet and get started on the path to personal food, fuel and financial independence.
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